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Offline PA

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MORE than 20 passengers were injured when an Asiana Airlines Airbus A320 overran a runway in western Japan after its tail struck the ground.

The South Korean carrier’s Flight OZ162, which took off at Incheon airport in northwestern South Korea, was attempting to land in Hiroshima when the incident occurred on Tuesday evening, officials said.

The Aviation Herald reports the Airbus A320-200 with 74 passengers and eight crew on board was on approach to Hiroshima’s runway 28 at about 20:05 local time but touched down about 330 metres short of the runway.

The tail struck the ground, the aircraft broke through the localiser antenna, skidded down to the right of the runway turning 180 degrees around in the process and came to a stop about 1500 metres past the runway.

“Around 23 passengers were injured, but no one was killed,” a local fire department official said. “So far we have heard that all of the injuries were not serious.”

All of the passengers and crew members on board escaped from the plane’s emergency exits, local media reported.

Japan’s Ministry of Transport reported that the aircraft suffered a tail strike with sparks visible from the tail section upon touchdown, as well as substantial damage to left wing and left engine.

Japan’s TSB have opened an investigation into the accident.

This is the second time Asiana has crash landed a jet in two years.

In 2013 an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 crashed at San Francisco International Airport after landing short of the runway, killing three passengers and injuring another 181 on board.

In that incident the tail of the jet impacted the seawall in front of the runway.

Pilot Ken Block has been relieved of his license.



Offline PA

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An Asiana Airlines plane smashed into a   communications antenna as it came in to land at a Japanese airport,   footage showed, injuring 27 people in an accident with echoes of the   Korean airline's fatal 2013 crash in San Francisco.
Aerial   footage from Hiroshima airport in western Japan showed the localiser --   a large gate-like structure, six metres (20 feet) high that sits around   300 metres from the start of the runway -- splintered, with debris   spread towards the landing strip.
Sets of wheel   marks were visible on the grass area in front of the runway, while large   fragments of the localiser -- part of the instrument landing system --   were on the tarmac.
Several hundred metres away,   skid marks showed the Airbus A320 had careered off the runway Tuesday   and rotated more than 90 degrees.
What appeared to be a chunk of the localiser was seen dangling from one wing and emergency escape chutes were deployed.
Those on board flight OZ162 from Incheon, near Seoul, to Hiroshima, spoke of terror and confusion.
"There   was smoke coming out and some of the oxygen masks fell down. Cabin   attendants were in such a panic and I thought 'We are going to die'," a   woman told Japanese networks late Tuesday, adding some people were   bleeding.
A man wearing a neck brace said he "saw flames, and smoke filled the plane".
All 73 passengers and eight crew evacuated safely but 27 people were injured, Japanese officials said.
Hiroshima   police have started an on-site investigation on suspicion of   professional negligence resulting in injuries, Jiji Press said.
The airport is equipped with a sophisticated landing system, which   can provide full assistance on direction and altitude when planes   approach from the west, it said.
But the Asiana   plane was approaching from the east because of wind direction,   preventing the pilot -- reportedly a veteran from South Korea -- from   being able to make full use of the system, media said.
The   South Korean carrier said 18 passengers -- 14 Japanese, two Koreans and   two Chinese -- had been hurt. Only one of them had to stay overnight in   hospital. There was no explanation for the discrepancy between Asiana   and Japanese authorities.
- San Francisco echoes -
"Asiana Airlines apologises for causing concern to the passengers and the people over the accident," it said in a statement.
"Asiana Airlines has immediately set up a response team to cope with the aftermath.
"As to the determination of the cause of the accident, we will cooperate as closely as possible with the relevant authorities."
An   Asiana spokeswoman told AFP in Seoul the firm was checking Japanese   news reports that the flight was approaching the runway at a lower   altitude than normal before it grazed the nearby communications tower.
Tuesday's   accident had echoes of an Asiana flight that crashed in San Francisco   in July 2013, killing three people and leaving 182 injured.
US   investigators concluded that a mismanaged landing approach in a highly   automated cockpit was the probable cause of the accident, in which a   Boeing 777 clipped a sea wall with its landing gear and then crashed and   burst into flames.
The South Korean Transport ministry ordered a 45-day suspension of Asiana Airlines' service to San Francisco as a penalty.
The   cause of Tuesday's accident was not yet known but "it looks very   similar to the San Francisco" incident, said Akira Maene, a former pilot   at leading Japanese carrier All Nippon Airways.
"Passengers' lives were saved because the angle of hitting (the runway) was shallow," he told the private Fuji network.
"It was just one step away from a major disaster."
South Korean and French air disaster investigators are to join their counterparts from the Japan Transport Safety Board.
"A   team of two investigators, accompanied by four technical advisers from   Airbus, is leaving for Hiroshima today," said a statement on the website   of France's BEA air accident investigation agency.



Offline BenC

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Thats actually a pretty good landing for them :P

Jokes aside, its taken a while but people are finally starting to figure out that hand flying skills matter.  And in that part of the world, there is a severe lack of them, as evidenced by recent happenings.



Offline hummel


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Thats actually a pretty good landing for them :P

Jokes aside, its taken a while but people are finally starting to figure out that hand flying skills matter.  And in that part of the world, there is a severe lack of them, as evidenced by recent happenings.

Quite true, hand flying is much more common in the smaller aircraft than the larger. A mate is flies for Rex out of Sydney and bangs on about how much hard it is to fly the Saab's over the big boys.. hence he's going for a job with the big boys! :D

It's also a lot more involving flying the little 152/172's!



Offline BenC

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He's going to be disappointed when he finds out that flinging a little Saab 340B around is a fair bit easier than a swept wing jet.  heh.



Offline hummel


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He's going to be disappointed when he finds out that flinging a little Saab 340B around is a fair bit easier than a swept wing jet.  heh.

I still don't know how he flies for a living, he was even late to my wedding as he was seeing a girl the night before!!




Offline futurism


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I flew Asiana Sydney to Seoul recently, survived to tell the tale.
Until the incident a year ago, and now this, they were frequently the worlds best airline in numerous categories.
I know the cultural issues in Korea will be blamed again for this, as per their previous incident, as per the Korean airlines incidents.

Having spent a month in Korea on my own observing people around me, I can see how this would be a problem.

If a random old lady told a teenage boy acting like a tough guy on a train to shut up and show some manners here, it wouldnt result in profuse apology and embarrassment on behalf of the teenage boy. I saw numerous incidents which in the context were amusing, not so much when you are too shy to tell the flight captain somethings wrong.

The moral of this story, showing respect to your elders is a bad thing!



Offline Westvic


  • Joined: Feb 2015

  • Location: Melbourne
The airlines in Korea had a huge cultural problem   resulting in very poor cockpit  culture
A  few years ago ALL  the pilots of a major Korean airline were retrained by Aussies and americans from delta airlines TO BREED A PROPER COCKPIT ENVIROMENT        May  be a long way to go  looking at recent accident



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