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Offline allanuber


  • Joined: Aug 2007

  • Location: Sydney
  • Name: Al

You're trying to over-science it.

What happens when you go to dealer to trade an import is they go 'hrmmm, that's no good, I'll call around'. They then offer you a half eaten jam donut with the jam sucked out as a trade.

If you go private, you have every forum reader in the country go, 'hrrmmmm, that's a shame, I'll offer you an old shoe'.

I've got 2 good mates trying to sell now, and they are really getting beaten up. Again, I'm not talking general theory, but about the actual market today if you plan to move a car, where there are fewer buyers, they are more studied and they deal harder. Maybe it'll change if the market bounces back.

BTW - I'm looking at buying another something that's imported today/now as well ... so it swings both ways, but I'm not buying it to flip/sell/move on.
C'mon, do it!



Offline mhh

  • Chief Test Pilot

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Location: Adelaide
You're trying to over-science it.

What happens when you go to dealer to trade an import is they go 'hrmmm, that's no good, I'll call around'. They then offer you a half eaten jam donut with the jam sucked out as a trade.

If you go private, you have every forum reader in the country go, 'hrrmmmm, that's a shame, I'll offer you an old shoe'.


So don't you just buy an import cheaper?  You know that they'll be worth a lot less than a local car when you sell, so you pay a lot less when you buy.  It's always been this way.



Offline allanuber


  • Joined: Aug 2007

  • Location: Sydney
  • Name: Al

I'm agreeing on that. Its cheaper to buy the import.

The point I'm failing to make though is the tear-up is even bigger on the eventual sale/trade, even accounting for that cheaper buy price.
C'mon, do it!



Offline anotherforumuser

  • AE's voice of reason
  • Choose to take risks or settle for ordinary.

  • Joined: Sep 2010

  • Drives: A red car.
  • Location: Downunder
In the long run, in this day and age, if youre worried about losing money on a car youre buying it for the wrong reason.

Many years ago you could buy a used, almost new Porsche and in 3 years time the price of later model Porsches meant you could resell it for a profit. Those days are gone. The GEC brought with it the global dumping of expensive cars and changed the playing field.

So to me the answer is YES, drive your Ferrari home from melbourne. Its a car, you brought it to drive, not mount on the wall. If you bought it for any other reason than to drive then you made a mistake.



Offline dodger

  • Tommy Gunna

  • Joined: Dec 2009

  • Location: Melbourne
Many years ago you could buy a used, almost new Porsche and in 3 years time the price of later model Porsches meant you could resell it for a profit.

Amen to that I remember yonks ago my boss bought a 280SE Merc cost more than most of the houses we were selling (agents) it actually went up in price the thought of it depreciating was laughable..........well yuk yuk cough cough no ones laughing now, how do the Govt manage to stuff (lets keep the site clean)everything up regardless of what it is ?



Offline flamestone

  • Geekographer

  • Joined: Jul 2007

  • Drives: to and from everywhere
  • Location: Central Coast
  • Name: Shane
  • www: Flamestone.com
If you bought it for any other reason than to drive then you made a mistake.

Not really a mistake.  Everyone has their own reasons for buying.

The fact that he's posted this question in the first place suggests that he's got different values to you and I (who would obviously just jump in a drive to Canberra without hesitation  :D).

Just keep in mind that jumping in and driving without hesitation doesn't equal jumping in and driving without planning.

Having done both an Adelaide-Sydney and Melbourne-Sydney run last year alone, I highly recommend the experience.

But don't ignore the basics like keeping tow truck numbers with you, carrying a puncture repair kit, and phoning in your position as regularly as necessary.



Offline mhh

  • Chief Test Pilot

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Location: Adelaide
I'm agreeing on that. Its cheaper to buy the import.

The point I'm failing to make though is the tear-up is even bigger on the eventual sale/trade, even accounting for that cheaper buy price.

I've never owned an import but it is interesting that they depreciate faster than locally delivered cars.  I thought they would lose value at the same rate, all other things being equal.  The faster loss of value is then a hidden cost of buying an import.










Offline scud

  • 300kph+ club
  • Rocket man

  • Joined: Mar 2006

  • Location:
  • Drives:
I distinctly remember Scud taking delivery of his 430 in Melbourne and driving it back to Brisbane non-stop......... so Melbourne-Canberra is a doddle. Off you go!
and a gallardo, just not at the same time.  :dopey:



Offline Wattens

  • Free Mustache Rides
  • The only wrong decision is Regret

  • Joined: Jan 2010

  • Drives: Cars
  • Location: Earth
  • Name: Knob Head
I disagree. The import actual buying/selling prices have not fallen anywhere near as fast as the Aussie ones have. This is for a number of reasons but some are that Aussie cars are having to compete a little bit with imports as more people are finding that aussie delivered and import doesn't make much of a difference (assuming you are comparing cars that are similar in condition).
The demand for imports is rising, although not as fast as there are shit imports making it to our shores and flooding the market and then giving a sense that all imports are shit, which definately isn't the case.

Buy an import at a good price and you can drive it for 6 months - a year and sell it (privately) and still get similar money back. Although you have to choose your model and specs carefully. No matter what anyone says or what an individuals personal tatse is, Red or black with Tan/creme interiors ALWAYS fetch a higher price and ALWAYS have more demand for them (more chance of selling), couple that with a later model of 2004-2005 as opposed to the earlier models, with all the extras, all the mechanical and electrical upgrades from the factory, F1 transmission (as that is what the market wants) and you are on a winner come resale, although you may not get as much as an Aussie delivered car but you also didn't pay as much for it in the beginning.

 Try doing that with an Aussie delivered car and I garantee you will be raped even more and all you will keep hearing is "I can buy a UK import for $30k cheaper and it is a later model... bla bla bla". I have been there and done that. I unlike most others have bought and sold both Aussie delivered and UK import 360's.

However if you buy a car that is too different than what the majority of the market wants (EG: a traditional manual, black interior, 1999-2001 model, blue, silver, petrol blue, yellow, high milage, then you will have a hard time selling the car unless you severely reduce the price.

Unless you are going to keep the car for a long period of time (5 years or more) colour, age, milage, transmission, records etc all play an important role if you wouldn't mind not loosing as much as you otherwise would in depreciation. Just like the Imports are bringing the Aussie cars down in price, so does the opposite apply to a certain extent of Aussie cars keeping imports higher than they otherwise could be.

The same thing has happened to the Mitsubishi evo's. My Jap import Nissan over 5 years has only lost $1000 of valuation even though it is 5 years older and has 80 000km extra on it.

Lets face it 360's will most probably NEVER be a collectors item like some previous Ferrari models, so why does Aussie compliance from new or compliance as a 2nd hand car matter?
You can not listen to a dealer because tehy have their own motives behind how they come to their conclusions, an import dealer will always say "why buy an aussie delivered car?" where as an aussie delivered dealer will always say " why would you buy an import?". This whole topic is bassed on what is the alterior motive of who you ask?

Uber I understand what you mean saying that you will get screwed when trying to sell an import ferrari especially to a dealer, but you must have an idea of what trade ins dealers give to Aussie cars as well, the difference is next to nothing, i'd be surprised if an aussie delivered car gets $10k extra trade in than the equivalent import model in identical condition/age/milage etc.

Everyone can argue either side of this, at the end of the day the cars are the same, salt isn't an issue, who takes a supercar out in the snow? If anything our Australian sun does more damage than anything else.  Ferrari is a Ferrari, why knit pick at minor things or things that are made up by car dealers?
You can say I'm wrong, but my garage doesn't agree with that statement!!!



Offline Last_Ride


  • Joined: Sep 2007

  • Drives: a thing with 4 wheels
  • Location: VIC
  • Name: call me habib
Are we still on track or off track ??? Discussion is not relating to the topic but who cares I am loving it
my car does 0-100 in 30 mins

http://www.flickr.com/photos/44014241@N03/



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