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Offline racecomp

  • Carbon Fiber Gimp

  • Joined: Jan 2013

  • Location: Adelaide
  • Name: Steve
Ok who has them and what’s the deal, we are moving soon to the vale on 10 acres and it has a few Alpacas that we can have, it has two paddocks that are electrified all the way around.

What's the deal? Do I Keep them or get rid? I know nothing about them other than they eat and shit, are they high maintenance? I've had a quick look around Alpacas.com but would like real world info from a bloke’s world point of view.   



Offline rich_1979


  • Joined: Feb 2013

  • Location:
  • Drives:
Hi - we got one last year to protect our lambs from foxes etc. They need very little especially if you have 10 acres of grass for them (providing you don't have more than 1 per acre). The only thing they do need is annual shearing and vaccinations. Your local shearer will probably do the vaccination if you don't fancy it but we do our own. Shearing is around $25-50 per Alpaca, but you can often do a deal and get it cheaper if you let the shearer have the fleece (or you can sell them). If they haven't had their bits chopped off and you have males and females you can get upwards of $500 per alpaca if you breed them.

Hope that helps,

Rich



Offline Ferrari Fissatore

  • Soap Dodger

  • Joined: Jan 2007

  • Drives: its obsession
  • Location: under its skin
I dont want to alarm ya, but i'll arm ya with some important info.

Llamas push back harder than alpacas but goats are tighter than sheep.




Offline racecomp

  • Carbon Fiber Gimp

  • Joined: Jan 2013

  • Location: Adelaide
  • Name: Steve
I dont want to alarm ya, but i'll arm ya with some important info.

Llamas push back harder than alpacas but goats are tighter than sheep.

6 hours a day on the net would make you the lord of the rings….  :D



Offline racecomp

  • Carbon Fiber Gimp

  • Joined: Jan 2013

  • Location: Adelaide
  • Name: Steve
Hi - we got one last year to protect our lambs from foxes etc. They need very little especially if you have 10 acres of grass for them (providing you don't have more than 1 per acre). The only thing they do need is annual shearing and vaccinations. Your local shearer will probably do the vaccination if you don't fancy it but we do our own. Shearing is around $25-50 per Alpaca, but you can often do a deal and get it cheaper if you let the shearer have the fleece (or you can sell them). If they haven't had their bits chopped off and you have males and females you can get upwards of $500 per alpaca if you breed them.

Hope that helps,

Rich

Thanks Rich, so are they worth keeping? How long do they live for? Are they good to eat because if they spit on me on a bad day they are going straight to the BBQ.



Offline Paulstar


  • Joined: Jul 2008

  • Location: Sydney
Stayed on a farm with Alpacas but only for a few days and talked with the owners.

Benefits = you can sell the fleece, with 10 acres you'll be able to alternate them between paddocks so they always have food, if you have a guest house and it's not too out of the way you could do a BnB with the Alpacas as the attraction - girls love alpacas. I think the owners said something about their hooves not destroying the ground.

Negatives = they are a herd animal - unless you keep them together they fret.



Offline allanuber


  • Joined: Aug 2007

  • Location: Sydney
  • Name: Al

I've got a mate who works at Oracle who keeps a herd of alpacaacaaaiii

PM me your email addy and I'll introduce you to him if you've got questions.
C'mon, do it!



Offline j15


  • Joined: Oct 2006

  • Location: Sydney
Stayed on a farm with Alpacas but only for a few days and talked with the owners.

Benefits = you can sell the fleece, with 10 acres you'll be able to alternate them between paddocks so they always have food, if you have a guest house and it's not too out of the way you could do a BnB with the Alpacas as the attraction - girls love alpacas. I think the owners said something about their hooves not destroying the ground.

Negatives = they are a herd animal - unless you keep them together they fret.

Have we been to the same farm? I did a farm stay last year and had an identical conversation with the owners



Offline rich_1979


  • Joined: Feb 2013

  • Location:
  • Drives:
I'm not sure if you can eat them to be honest, they are "camelids" so related to camels, can you eat camel? Ours have never spat at us, although it has at the dogs which was most amusing! The breeder we bought ours off said they live 20-25 years, but the internet ranges from 15 years to 30 years (maybe different parts of the world they live longer/shorter. Never noticed the link to girls liking them, although I don't often use the alpaca as a pick up line......maybe I should try it lol

Unless you into them and want to breed them for some spare cash I would probably say sell them and stick a few sheep on the land, at least you can definitely eat them! We breed and sell dorper sheep, which don't need shearing so even easier to look after!

Rich



Offline Paulstar


  • Joined: Jul 2008

  • Location: Sydney
Have we been to the same farm? I did a farm stay last year and had an identical conversation with the owners

Possibly, I should've posted a link - this is the place http://www.dreamwoodinternational.com/ same place J?

Never noticed the link to girls liking them, although I don't often use the alpaca as a pick up line......maybe I should try it lol

Do it  :D



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