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Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

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I'm a pretty chilled and calm guy, a glass breaks or door slams or exhaust backfires or I get tapped on the shoulder and it rarely upsets my balance, whereas I see people around me like meerkats wide eyed bushy tailed.

But there was one instance a couple days ago that made me wonder how prepared I am for "day-to-day disaster".

I live in a highrise (for Adelaide :rolleyes: ) so elevators are my life, on Friday we were up to the 12th floor, then a massive *CRACK* noise boomed from above us, and the lift plummeted briefly - maybe 2 feet maybe 20 feet, in a stainless steel box we had no point of reference - then after bouncing and stabilising, after 30 secs it continued its journey and delivered us to my floor. (with us praying to every God we'd ever heard of)

So I've often thought of theoretically the best ways to survive an elevator fall, but for the first time I considered it an actual possibility. (also, just watched Devil a few days ago - not helping)

The idea of jumping at the last minute seems futile, I don't even know whether you'd sort of be on the floor, stuck to the ceiling in freefall, or airborne. My mate who was in it with me said he'd just try to land on his side, cos weve built up some padding over time. :?

In the end my best solution - if possible - is to grab the handrail (if present) and push yourself to the floor - especially your head. You might end up with broken legs/back/etc, but if done right your head should receive minimal shock.

Anyhoo, what are some "everyday" disasters you are prepared for?




Offline allanuber


  • Joined: Aug 2007

  • Location: Sydney
  • Name: Al

Try to land on your mate. His padding will help you.

Aside -> that Devil in the lift movie. Great. Watched it on the last flight.

In terms of real emergencies, from my time on big ships - explosions are a million times louder and hotter than you expect, water is colder, falling is more painful. We're products of movies where heros jump through fire to land on a plane wing before shooting a helicocpter out of the sky using a blowdart. As much as the human body's amazing, it's a relatively soft sack holding in a bit of gristle and fluid. Great discussion topic but in many cases surviving is as much luck as quick thinking.
C'mon, do it!



Offline fivesix


  • Joined: Jun 2007

  • Location: TMBA / BNE / MEL
I've read heaps of things on how to survive lift falls, and even watched bear grylls explain how...


Can't remember any of them!


If that happened to me, I'd take the stairs...



Offline dkabab

Just in reference to the lift, i remember reading that they have 4 cables, and each one can support the weight of a fully loaded lift.



Offline cel

Wasn't there something on mythbusters about this? I vaguely remember something like that...

Edit:

Myth statement: It is possible to survive by jumping up at the last moment before a freefalling elevator hits the ground.   

Status: Busted   

Notes: The jumping power of a human being cannot cancel out the falling velocity of the elevator; the elevator car impacted at 53 mph (85 km/h), while a human being can only jump at around 2 or 3 mph (3 or 5 km/h), not enough to make a significant difference in the impact force. The best speculative advice from an elevator expert would be to lie on the elevator floor instead of jumping. Adam and Jamie speculated the attendant survived because the tight elevator shaft created an air cushion. This together with spring action from slack elevator cable could have slowed the car to survivable speeds.



Offline AshSimmonds

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I'm acutely aware of how we're just fragile bags of meat, I've broken my neck, some ribs, a kneecap, some teeth, almost bitten off my tongue, have stitches in my face, throat, tongue, elbow, knee, leg, foot... Etc. :?

Just in reference to the lift, i remember reading that they have 4 cables, and each one can support the weight of a fully loaded lift.

Ok, I'd love to know just which one of four cables it was that snapped. :eek:





Offline AshSimmonds

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  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
Wasn't there something on mythbusters about this? I vaguely remember something like that...

I figgered there would be, and I'm guessing the outcome is that it's futile to try to survive. :?

I recognise the authority of mortality if I'm putting myself at insane risks like many of the things I've done and got away with, but mundane stuff like this where I could plummet in an elevator or slip in the shower or suffocate in my pillow and just shake off the mortal coil without effort - does my head in.



Offline anotherforumuser

  • AE's voice of reason
  • Choose to take risks or settle for ordinary.

  • Joined: Sep 2010

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  • Location: Downunder
What did the lift company say when you reported it?



Offline dodger

  • Tommy Gunna

  • Joined: Dec 2009

  • Location: Melbourne
I don't think it's possible for all the systems on a lift to fail letting it fall but it's a good theme for a movie.

When I'm flying if we drop suddenly I'm not happy at all but I'm the same on roller coasters (never again)

http://express.howstuffworks.com/runaway-elevator.htm



Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
What did the lift company say when you reported it?

There's no contact details in the elevator - I went down to my building administration office this morning but they were closed.