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Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
Need to ask my work if I can transfer to nightshift. :?



Offline adam01


  • Joined: Nov 2009

  • Location:
  • Drives:



Offline dodger

  • Tommy Gunna

  • Joined: Dec 2009

  • Location: Melbourne
Bed at midnight wake at 4 watch 5am news, feel finished by noon.



Offline Ferrari Fissatore

  • Soap Dodger

  • Joined: Jan 2007

  • Drives: its obsession
  • Location: under its skin
worked hard all week (40 hrs physical, 20 hrs mental/admin), bed at 10pm, woke at 8am.

aaaaah, lovely!



Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
Update: since going almost full carnivore, I've been able to sleep just fine, go figger. :doh:

Also, noticed a pattern, I sleep for 4-5 hours, wake up refreshed and get up and do stuff for an hour or two, then want more sleep so hit bed for another 2-3 hours.

This sorta seems optimal, also it means I nearly always catch the sunrise (which looks faaaabulous from my place), and lucid dreaming is so much easier in the second sleep cycle - then I saw this article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16964783

Quote
The myth of the eight-hour sleep

In the early 1990s, psychiatrist Thomas Wehr conducted an experiment in which a group of people were plunged into darkness for 14 hours every day for a month.

It took some time for their sleep to regulate but by the fourth week the subjects had settled into a very distinct sleeping pattern. They slept first for four hours, then woke for one or two hours before falling into a second four-hour sleep.

In 2001, historian Roger Ekirch of Virginia Tech published a seminal paper, drawn from 16 years of research, revealing a wealth of historical evidence that humans used to sleep in two distinct chunks.

His book At Day's Close: Night in Times Past, published four years later, unearths more than 500 references to a segmented sleeping pattern - in diaries, court records, medical books and literature, from Homer's Odyssey to an anthropological account of modern tribes in Nigeria.



Offline PA

  • One man comedy gala

  • Joined: Jan 2008

  • Location: www.club-carbon.com
Research has shown that most people get up during the night to go home.



Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
Update: since going almost full carnivore, I've been able to sleep just fine, go figger. :doh:

Also, noticed a pattern, I sleep for 4-5 hours, wake up refreshed and get up and do stuff for an hour or two, then want more sleep so hit bed for another 2-3 hours.

This sorta seems optimal, also it means I nearly always catch the sunrise (which looks faaaabulous from my place), and lucid dreaming is so much easier in the second sleep cycle - then I saw this article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16964783

Quote
The myth of the eight-hour sleep

In the early 1990s, psychiatrist Thomas Wehr conducted an experiment in which a group of people were plunged into darkness for 14 hours every day for a month.

It took some time for their sleep to regulate but by the fourth week the subjects had settled into a very distinct sleeping pattern. They slept first for four hours, then woke for one or two hours before falling into a second four-hour sleep.

In 2001, historian Roger Ekirch of Virginia Tech published a seminal paper, drawn from 16 years of research, revealing a wealth of historical evidence that humans used to sleep in two distinct chunks.

His book At Day's Close: Night in Times Past, published four years later, unearths more than 500 references to a segmented sleeping pattern - in diaries, court records, medical books and literature, from Homer's Odyssey to an anthropological account of modern tribes in Nigeria.

MDA is on-board with my approach to slumber:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-conduct-a-personal-experiment-biphasic-sleeping







Offline anotherforumuser

  • AE's voice of reason
  • Choose to take risks or settle for ordinary.

  • Joined: Sep 2010

  • Drives: A red car.
  • Location: Downunder
Since going caveman, I hardly sleep, hardly eat, compared to my past over eating and Im rarely hungry or tired.




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