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Offline Steve.


  • Joined: Mar 2008

  • Drives: AMG.
  • Location: Adelaide.
  • Name: Steve
Holy crap - how did nobody call me out on this?

I've been nearly 4 months in a beach shack 3/4 of the time completely alone with nothing but meat and grog - and haven't written down a thought. :?

Move to Tangier - follow in the footsteps of some literary greats.

You'll probably end up hocking the Lotus for smack, though  :?



Offline futurism


  • Joined: Jan 2009

  • Drives: Regretfully sold my GT3
  • Location: Adelaide
  • Name: David
I have helped a number of creative people with achieving deadlines and project managing what they claim is art that doesnt work that way.

There are lots of techniques to do this, and I am sure you know of most of them.

One thing I did for musicians was start 24 hour composing sessions, which ran globally for a number of years.
Quite a few of the ideas that came out of those sessions have ended up on commercial releases.

Similarly I have helped a couple of young guys getting into film composing project manage their output.
I dont really see a difference between film composing and business in general, an incremental iterative approach is best!
These guys now live in L.A. and work in proper studios on terrible crap hollywood movies, but at least they are getting paid to do what they like to do.

For many people its about removing distraction, not sure if you have tried that, if you were in solitary confinement with only what you need to write a book, would you have achieved more output?
If the answer is no, you have no book to write!

For other people, the issue is perceived lack of quality. It is difficult for many to understand that bad or poor quality work is better than nothing. It doesnt have to be shared or released, it can often be re used and improved.

If you were talking about composing music theres lots of specific techniques involving limiting yourself to form the basis of new ideas, such as 1 string only on the guitar, pick 4 notes at random and only use those, fill out a score sheet with seemingly random tempos or key signatures and then write music to fit, take something you already wrote and re write it by  using the same melody or rhythm in a different sequence etc.

Perhaps there are similar techniques to use for writing.

Once you get past that you are into what film makers call storyboarding, what composers call charts. You need a similar thing for any book that will allow you to work on different bits rather than trying to write from start to finish.

Again, I reiterate, you are probably aware of all of these techniques, practicing what you preach is a far more difficult task, ask any preacher :)



Offline mondi

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Offline AshSimmonds

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  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
For many people its about removing distraction, not sure if you have tried that, if you were in solitary confinement with only what you need to write a book, would you have achieved more output?

If the answer is no, you have no book to write!

This is what it comes down to, but also that removing distraction is also often the RESULT of inspiration.

Many won't get this because they've never had true inspiration, but when you are bitten by a bug to do something, distractions aren't even an issue.

FWIW I didn't realise this until quite recently, my gf heard me talk passionately about my past projects which were all highly creative endeavours, and asked what that feels like to KNOW what you want to do, and HOW to do it. She's a smart and creative girl - but it didn't occur to me that she's spent her whole life without feeling any purpose.

I didn't really know what to say - doesn't everyone get overwhelmed by an idea to do something? Turns out no. It's just that I spent six months averaging 16 hours a day on one project because I believed in what I could achieve, and have done many other smaller feats since - I know the feeling of inspiration, apparently it's fairly rare.

Point being - the general self-help-book advice of removing distractions is *ok* for those with too many distractions and no inspiration, but truly, one with inspiration can ignore distractions with no problem.





Offline Paulstar


  • Joined: Jul 2008

  • Location: Sydney
I'm with Mr Futurism, perhaps if you're truly inspired you'll drop everything and push your idea as hard and fast as you can but one could present the point that too many distractions effectively block inspiration, I've seen creative people, smart people who care about what they do churn out work which is 'just good enough' because requests come in hard and fast.

Take the same person, remove those nagging distractions and give them a blank canvas - imho you'll get something inspired.



Offline AshSimmonds

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  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
I'm with Mr Futurism, perhaps if you're truly inspired you'll drop everything and push your idea as hard and fast as you can but one could present the point that too many distractions effectively block inspiration, I've seen creative people, smart people who care about what they do churn out work which is 'just good enough' because requests come in hard and fast.

Take the same person, remove those nagging distractions and give them a blank canvas - imho you'll get something inspired.

The first part of your sentence says exactly what I am ("if you're truly inspired you'll drop everything") but then it's confounding ("too many distractions effectively block inspiration") - circular logic. :confused:

In the end I'm still with - er, me. :p

There's a hybrid point to be made of course, which I think is what you're talking about.

Take someone who has moderate inspiration but too many distractions (mortgage/wife/kids/bills/job/facebook/twitter/saving to have fun) and you've got a recipe for someone potentially awesome but just might never get that chance.

Then take someone with none of those barriers to achievement but only has mediocre inspiration (stoner/bludger/alcoholic/dropout/etc), they'll do only as much as they absolutely need to do in order to get by.

This line is crossed perfectly in this scene of Office Space - it succinctly outlines the people who spend their life doing "something" with enough money but eventually hoping to do nothing, versus the folk who do nothing, but eventually want enough money to do "something".

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQ-bp_A61MI" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQ-bp_A61MI</a>




In the end we do what we need to. Some need to do more than others.





Offline dodger

  • Tommy Gunna

  • Joined: Dec 2009

  • Location: Melbourne
Watching The Hustler made me wonder whatever happened to this thread.



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