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Offline blackr35


  • Joined: Jan 2012

  • Location: adl



Offline Brenton

  • 300kph+ club
  • DJ's like a mad ...........

  • Joined: May 2009

  • Drives: Yes
  • Location: Adelaide






Offline David B


  • Joined: Dec 2015

  • Location:
  • Drives:
I 'll throw my end in here;
last week bit the bullet and I am now officially on a weight loss program of my own devices;

starting weight 118.5 kg height 190 cm or old 6'2 = BMI 33 or officially obese cat 1!

As I have mentioned before I used to be in army and in selection we did no food 4 days (with no sleep 3 of em!) so I knew what I was in for to get the old body into fat burning mode.

Now into day 6,  Tennis twice a week, 30 minutes walking a day and eating no more than 1000KJ a day of either salad, or some sushi ( so I dont suck the protein from my eyes !!!).

Anyway all good now stomach is used to lower food level (thank god for mylanta!! on days 1-2!)

Weigh in tomorrow should be about 113 Kg but most of this weeks loss will be water  :grumpy:

Target weight 95 Kg which was my fit fighting weight, and I could run 5 Km with weight in 18:10 m..... those running day are gone now.

Wish me luck and I have gotten some real inspiration from the topic !!

Cheers!



Offline Brenton

  • 300kph+ club
  • DJ's like a mad ...........

  • Joined: May 2009

  • Drives: Yes
  • Location: Adelaide
good luck

I would suggest in just taking your time, a kg / week is a good goal and sustainable

crash diets have been proven not to work



Offline David B


  • Joined: Dec 2015

  • Location:
  • Drives:
good luck

I would suggest in just taking your time, a kg / week is a good goal and sustainable

crash diets have been proven not to work

yep agree, if you dont sustain it after say week two your body goes into starvation mode and many drop out and go on a binge.  After week two I will up the KJ intake so I am as you said dropping a realistic amount per week.
Thanks for your advice and support!!



Offline JPG


  • Joined: Jun 2016

  • Location: ADL
I 'll throw my end in here;
last week bit the bullet and I am now officially on a weight loss program of my own devices;

starting weight 118.5 kg height 190 cm or old 6'2 = BMI 33 or officially obese cat 1!

As I have mentioned before I used to be in army and in selection we did no food 4 days (with no sleep 3 of em!) so I knew what I was in for to get the old body into fat burning mode.

Now into day 6,  Tennis twice a week, 30 minutes walking a day and eating no more than 1000KJ a day of either salad, or some sushi ( so I dont suck the protein from my eyes !!!).

Anyway all good now stomach is used to lower food level (thank god for mylanta!! on days 1-2!)

Weigh in tomorrow should be about 113 Kg but most of this weeks loss will be water  :grumpy:

Target weight 95 Kg which was my fit fighting weight, and I could run 5 Km with weight in 18:10 m..... those running day are gone now.

Wish me luck and I have gotten some real inspiration from the topic !!

Cheers!

Firstly, congratulations on taking the first step, and to offer some unsolicited advice:

Brenton is completely right and crash dieting is an illogical thing to do. You're eating a ridiculously little amount at 239kcal a day. For your height and weight you'd want to eat about 2300kcal a day simply for your body to be in maintenance mode and it's widely advised to eat 500 calories under maintenance mode to lose weight.

Eating so little, your brain will respond to such a little amount of food by decreasing the calories your body burns. On top of that, you're also going to feel weaker and more tired, as well as losing muscle mass. Not as good as you think.

I started at a similar height+weight (6'1, 115kg, eventually down to 80kg) and at the lowest, I was consuming 1500kcal a day, so I'd advise that as a refined target personally.

The most important things I found for losing weight were to firstly eat lots of protein and fiber - these things keep you feeling fuller for longer, basically tricking the body into eating less. Secondly would be to pick up some kind of resistance training, some kind of yoga and pilates are good, lifting weights is probably best. As well as being a calorie burner, these kinds of exercises have been shown to boost your BMR (basal metabolism rate), which is the rate your body burns calories at whilst resting. More calories burnt for about 36 hours after a good workout for nothing, good deal.

Good luck and be responsible, it's not a race.



Offline David B


  • Joined: Dec 2015

  • Location:
  • Drives:
Firstly, congratulations on taking the first step, and to offer some unsolicited advice:

Brenton is completely right and crash dieting is an illogical thing to do. You're eating a ridiculously little amount at 239kcal a day. For your height and weight you'd want to eat about 2300kcal a day simply for your body to be in maintenance mode and it's widely advised to eat 500 calories under maintenance mode to lose weight.

Eating so little, your brain will respond to such a little amount of food by decreasing the calories your body burns. On top of that, you're also going to feel weaker and more tired, as well as losing muscle mass. Not as good as you think.

I started at a similar height+weight (6'1, 115kg, eventually down to 80kg) and at the lowest, I was consuming 1500kcal a day, so I'd advise that as a refined target personally.

The most important things I found for losing weight were to firstly eat lots of protein and fiber - these things keep you feeling fuller for longer, basically tricking the body into eating less. Secondly would be to pick up some kind of resistance training, some kind of yoga and pilates are good, lifting weights is probably best. As well as being a calorie burner, these kinds of exercises have been shown to boost your BMR (basal metabolism rate), which is the rate your body burns calories at whilst resting. More calories burnt for about 36 hours after a good workout for nothing, good deal.

Good luck and be responsible, it's not a race.

Hey great sage advice and I appreciate the factual numbers you have provided,  I actually feel fine, and I was going to up the KJ in 7 days.....

But I have listened to what you have said and I will now as of tomorrow up Kj to 1500 as you have recommended.

thanks !!!



Offline amgsl55

  • Tooth hurty

  • Joined: Feb 2011

  • Location: Adelaide
BMI may cost you higher insurance premiums despite questions over accuracy

With his Popeye forearms and washboard abs, Thomas Lacombe looks a picture of health.

Yet a tool widely used by government agencies, weight loss companies and insurers for gauging healthy weight suggests Mr Lacombe, a personal trainer and model, is fat.


Is BMI useful?
Thomas Lacombe, has a BMI rating that puts him in the overweight category because BMI doesn't distinguish between fat and muscle.
"I'm not in the healthy weight bracket," he said. "I'm literally overweight."

Mr Lacombe is 189 centimetres tall and weighs 97 kilograms, giving him a Body Mass Index of 27.2 well outside the healthy weight range of 20-25, according to insurance company Bupa's BMI calculator.

"That measurement right now doesn't really make sense," Mr Lacombe said.

The Bupa website cautions against using BMI calculated by dividing your weight in kilograms by your height in metres squared as a diagnostic tool.


It also suggests BMI can be an inaccurate measure of healthy weight for pregnant women, children, older people, athletes and "very muscular" people such as Mr Lacombe: "It may also need to be adjusted for some ethnic groups, including people of Asian, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent."

A Bupa spokesman said: "It is true that certain populations will not get an accurate picture of the healthiness of their weight in comparison with their height."


The accuracy of BMI has been questioned, yet insurers may charge higher premiums for life insurance on the basis of a heightened BMI.

"Life insurance is the only one that includes BMI as a part of the assessment process," Bupa's spokesman said.

Allianz Australia spokesman Nicholas Scofield said: "BMI is used in a similar way to other health risk factors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption."

Mr Scofield said BMI was not used in a "rigid manner" for pricing.


"Someone needs to be fairly overweight before it affects their premium," he said. "However, past a certain point, the clear link with health outcomes makes BMI a credible metric for underwriting and pricing."

A spokeswoman for TAL, Nicola Clancy, said the life insurance company offered discounts for people with a BMI within the healthy range, while "premiums only increase for people with a BMI of 34 and above".

"We've found people with a significantly higher BMI are more likely to suffer health problems," she said.

Dr Tony Bartone, the vice president of the Australian Medical Association, said BMI offers a "rough idea" of healthy weight: "The number is not the issue, it's how you interpret it that's the issue." panel showing equation to calculate your bmi

Associate Professor Amanda Salis, from The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders at Sydney University said BMI can alert someone to the need for a full health check.

"It is better as an estimate of population health than as an indicator of individual health," she said.

Professor Mark Harris, executive director of the University of NSW's Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, said the BMI was a simple measure that could be used alongside measuring the waist in routine practice.

"Other measures are more complex and may require costly equipment or imaging," he said. "The disadvantage is that it may not pick up variable body composition and shape, especially the mix of muscle and fat."

A range of factors also needed to be considered, including physical activity, diet, medications and mental health, he added.

Gordon Lynch, a professor at the University of Melbourne's Department of Physiology, said BMI was based on a reasonable assumption that your weight should be related to your height.

Professor Lynch said mounting evidence suggested that measurements of abdominal obesity as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were more important as predictors of health risk.

"Waistline fat is thought to be particularly dangerous because it secretes hormones and other compounds thought to contribute to the development of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancers," he said.

Being physically inactive was more of a health risk than being overweight, he added. "Thin and inactive people are just as likely to develop chronic diseases, like heart disease and diabetes, as overweight people."

http://www.theage.com.au/nsw/bmi-may-cost-you-higher-insurance-premiums-despite-questions-over-accuracy-20170330-gva0yz.html



Offline dkabab

Quote
Mr Lacombe is 189 centimetres tall and weighs 97 kilograms, giving him a Body Mass Index of 27.2 well outside the healthy weight range of 20-25, according to insurance company Bupa's BMI calculator.


So at 187cm and 110kg I must be a hippo....



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