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Offline mhh

  • Chief Test Pilot

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Location: Adelaide
I like the sound of the new PDK gearbox - although there something slightly sad knowing that manual cars will now forever be slower. 

I'll be interested to see what the new box is like to drive.   I'd probably still go manual next time though.

http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/News/Search-Results/First-Official-Pictures/Porsche-911-the-new-2009-model/



Offline leburpor

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I like the sound of the new PDK gearbox - although there something slightly sad knowing that manual cars will now forever be slower. 


pfftt...who needs to drive a stick  :p



Offline AshSimmonds

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http://www.drive.com.au/Editorial/ArticleDetail.aspx?articleID=53775&IsPgd=0

Quote
Porsche PDK - New double-clutch gearbox in detail

If you want the fastest Porsche 911 on the market then you’ll have to pay extra for the new automatic transmission, known as PDK.

The more efficient PDK gearbox produces faster shifting times that make PDK-equipped 911s quicker than their manual counterparts. But they’ll bring a price premium of about $6500.

The new PDK transmission also includes a seventh gear designed purely for reducing fuel consumption at freeway speeds.

Porsche refers to the PDK – in German it stands for Porsche doppelkupplungsgetriebe and translates to Porsche double-clutch – as an automated manual, but to the driver it operates as a regular automatic.

Replacing the Tiptronic transmission in the Porsche sports car line-up, the PDK uses two clutches for significantly lower gearshift times. Combined with all-new engines for the 911 it leads to significantly faster acceleration times.

Similar in principle to the Volkswagen DSG system that pioneered the increasingly popular twin-clutch technology in road cars, Porsche’s PDK was first used on a Porsche race car in 1983.

Porsche’s new PDK transmission is more efficient than a regular automatic because it’s effectively a manual gearbox with two computer controlled clutches. Unlike a regular automatic, such as the Tiptronic system PDK replaces, PDK has no torque converter.

The first, and largest, of the two clutches in the Porsche PDK system selects reverse, first, third, fifth and seventh gears (R, 1, 3, 5 and 7).

The second clutch – which actually sits inside the diameter of the larger first clutch – selects second, fourth and sixth gears (2, 4 and 6).

When starting off from a standstill, first gear is engaged while second is already preselected, ready to be almost instantly engaged by the second clutch.

Once second gear is selected third gear is then preselected ready for another gearchange in just a few hundredths of a second.

Available for now on the new Porsche 911 the PDK transmission will also be fitted to the smaller Boxster and Cayman models as well as the upcoming Panamera.

Porsche says the Cayenne off-road wagon will continue with the Tiptronic – a regular automatic transmission – because it’s better suited to the style of vehicle.

Porsche’s PDK transmissions improve straight line acceleration through the benchmark 0-100km/h test by as much as 19 per cent.

PDK-equipped 911s are now as much as 0.4 seconds quicker to 100km/h than 911s with a manual gearbox and exactly the same engine output.

Compared with the original 997-generation 911, the second-generation 997 is around 0.1 seconds quicker to 100km/h due to the more powerful engines.

However, 911s fitted with the new PDK transmission are up to a full second quicker to 100km/h than the Tiptronic equipped models they now replace.

The PDK transmission has also allowed Porsche to let the revised engines rev slightly higher, for added performance, noise and drama.

As part of the PDK package Porsche added a seventh gear, chosen specifically for fuel consumption, a major thrust with the new 911 and Porsche’s moving forward.

All Porsche 911s reach their maximum speed in sixth gear. The seventh gear is used only when cruising at speeds above about 70km/h.

For even better performance the Porsche PDK transmission can be optioned with a Sports Chrono Package Plus kit.

The Sport Chrono pack brings a chronograph lap timer as well as added software for the gearbox that allows even faster, more aggressive gear changes and a Formula One-style launch control function that makes for faster take-offs.

Accompanying the PDK gearbox is a regular automatic gear selector with Park, Reverse, Neutral and Drive settings.

As with many modern automatics the lever can be shifted to the side to allow sequential gear changes by tapping the lever forward (upchange) and back (downchange). There are also buttons on the steering wheel that do the same thing but allow the driver to leave their hands on the wheel during changes.

PDK can be driven in three modes: regular, Sport and Sport Plus (the latter only available on cars fitted with the optional Sports Chrono Package Plus system).

The distinguishing features of each PDK mode are:

Regular
- smoother, more relaxed gear shifts with almost imperceptible changes
- maximum fuel efficiency
- greater propensity to use higher gears

Sport
- sharper, more aggressive gear changes
- increased throttle sensitivity, so you don’t push the accelerator as hard

Sport Plus
- fastest, most aggressive gear changes
- holds lower gears and higher engine revs for more instant response
- increased throttle sensitivity, so you don’t push the accelerator as hard
- F1-style launch control function
- stability control allows more aggressive driving before intervening

Porsche Australia boss Michael Winkler expects the PDK transmission to account for around 70 per cent of 911 sales; currently around half of all Porsche sports cars sold are automatics.

While Winkler admits it’s difficult to predict how many people will choose the automatic PDK 911, the fact it’s quicker and more economical would suggest it will easily be the more popular transmission.

911 performance: Manual v auto and Tiptronic v PDK
(0-100km/h for Porsche 911: new v old)


                                                2nd generation 997 911                      Original 997 911

911 Carrera manual                            4.9 seconds                              5.0 seconds
911 Carrera auto                                  4.7 seconds                              5.5 seconds
911 Carrera auto Sport Chrono         4.5 seconds                              n/a
911 Carrera S manual                         4.7 seconds                              4.8 second
911 Carrera S auto                               4.5 seconds                              5.3 seconds
911 Carrera S auto Sport Chrono      4.3 seconds                              n/a


Porsche 911: the models of 997 second generation

Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

Engine: 3.6-litre horizontally opposed six-cylinder
Power: 254kW at 6500rpm
Torque: 390Nm at 4400rpm
Weight: 1415kg (manual), 1445kg (PDK)
Gearbox: Six-speed manual or seven-speed PDK automatic
Fuel consumption: 10.3L/100km (manual), 9.8L/100km (PDK)
0-100km/h: 4.9 seconds (manual), 4.7 seconds (PDK), 4.5 seconds (PDK with Sport Chrono)
Top speed: 289km/h (manual), 287km/h (PDK)


Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe

Engine: 3.8-litre horizontally opposed six-cylinder
Power: 283kW at 6500rpm
Torque: 420Nm at 4400rpm
Weight: 1425kg (manual), 1455kg (PDK)
Gearbox: Six-speed manual or seven-speed PDK automatic
Fuel consumption: 10.6L/100km (manual), 10.2L/100km (PDK)
0-100km/h: 4.7 seconds (manual), 4.5 seconds (PDK), 4.3 seconds (PDK with Sport Chrono)
Top Speed: 302km/h (manual), 300kmh (PDK)


Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

Engine: 3.6-litre horizontally opposed six-cylinder
Power: 254kW at 6500rpm
Torque: 390Nm at 4400rpm
Weight: 1500kg (manual), 1530kg (PDK)
Gearbox: Six-speed manual or seven-speed PDK automatic
Fuel consumption: 10.4L/100km (manual), 9.9L/100km (PDK)
0-100km/h: 5.1 seconds (manual), 4.9 seconds (PDK), 4.7 seconds (PDK with Sport Chrono)
Top speed: 289km/h (manual), 287km/h (PDK)


Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet

Engine: 3.8-litre horizontally opposed six-cylinder
Power: 283kW at 6500rpm
Torque: 420Nm at 4400rpm
Weight: 1510kg (manual), 1540kg (PDK)
Gearbox: Six-speed manual or seven-speed PDK automatic
Fuel consumption: 10.8L/100km (manual), 10.3L/100km (PDK)
0-100km/h: 4.9 seconds (manual), 4.7 seconds (PDK), 4.5 seconds (PDK with Sport Chrono)
Top speed: 302km/h (manual), 300km/h (PDK)



Offline leburpor

  • Loves Tom Cruise

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I could live with a Carrera S PDK with Sport Chrono  :goodvibes:



Offline Aircon

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I could live with a Carrera S PDK with Sport Chrono  :goodvibes:

oh thank God!!

I love my car. Buy your own



Offline waz356


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Offline AshSimmonds

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http://www.drive.com.au/Editorial/ArticleDetail.aspx?ArticleID=56669&vf=12

Quote
First local drive: Porsche 911

Porsche’s new 911 Carrera range has been much hyped, but does it deliver on the promise? By RICHARD BLACKBURN.

Sometimes when a car’s reputation precedes it, you can be disappointed when you get behind the wheel.

It’s a bit like when a friend recommends a “hilarious” new movie and it barely provokes a giggle when you finally watch it.

That was the biggest fear at the local launch of the new Porsche 911 in Tasmania.

So much praise has been heaped on the car - and in particular its new PDK double-clutch automated manual transmission - you begin to wonder if it can be that good.

The doubt begins to fade at the first inner-city gear change and by the time you find a stretch of open country road, it has disappeared almost entirely.

The changes are as precise and lightning-fast at high speeds as they are relaxed and comfortable around town.

And the really endearing quality of the new seven-speed gearbox is that it seems to read your mind.
Come into a corner and the gearbox shifts up from sixth to second quicker than you could do it yourself; plant the accelerator on a straight stretch of road and the car bangs through the gears as if Michael Schumacher was the man with the hand on the lever.

The secret to the PDK, which stands for Porsche doppelkupplungsgetriebe – or double clutch – is that each of the two clutches selects a different gear as you accelerate, which means when you’rs in one gear, the next one has already been selected. That means it can be engaged with lightning speed when called upon.

It’s a similar principle to Volkswagen’s DSG system and a new application of technology Porsche used in its race cars in the 1980s.

At first, Porsche’s factory race drivers hated the new clutch, but they warmed to it when they were shown their lap times in PDK-equipped cars, so the story goes.

Porsche says it’s a similar story with their customers and the Tiptronic automatic that preceded the new system: although 50 per cent of previous Porsche owners preferred the manual transmission, 80 per cent of them were actually quicker in the superseded auto.

The carmaker now says even the Porsche factory driver who sets their official 0-100kmh times is quicker in the PDK auto.

For the record, the 911 Carrera S manual takes 4.7 seconds to reach 100kmh, while the auto takes 4.5secs (4.3secs if you option the $2980 Sports Chrono Plus pack which comes with launch control).

And according to Porsche, the launch control is so easy to operate, that even your grandmother can bang out a 4.3secs split.

To engage launch control, you simply put the car into “Sports Plus” mode, hold one foot on the brake and push the accelerator until you reach 6500rpm and a sign flashes up on the instrument panel telling you you’ve activated the system.

Then you take your foot off the brake and let the technology do the rest.

The new transmission has another trick up its sleeve for downshifting on tight corners. As you arrive at the corner, you can stab the accelerator hard and fast - which requires a bit of a leap of faith – and the car shifts from sixth to second.

It makes the new auto almost as much fun to play with as the excellent six-speed manual gearbox, which combines a short, accurate gear-lever action with a lightly weighted, user-friendly clutch pedal.

The one criticism with the PDK is the placement of the shift buttons on the steering wheel.

More than once, I accidentally dropped down a gear because my hand brushed the buttons. It’s a small gripe, but paddles would be a better option. While we're on the negatives, being stung $7000 for an auto when you've paid more than $200,000 for the car is a bit rude as well. There are more "optional extra" shocks for the uninitiated, too.

The new transmissions aren’t the only reason behind the latest Porsche’s impressive acceleration times.

The new 3.6-litre and 3.8-litre six-cylinder horizontally-opposed engines may have the same capacity as their predecessors - and put out that familiar clatter at idle - but they are all-new, with more power and better fuel consumption thanks to the latest direct injection technology.

We sampled both the 254kW 3.6-litre and the 283kW 3.8-litre and were impressed not only by the sheer power, but the useability of the engines.

The power delivery is flat and predictable and the surge goes almost all the way to the 7500rpm redline. The last 1000rpm may not give you any more power, but it’s worth pushing on just for the incredible roar of the engine.

The engines both sound equally impressive at low revs, while at the same time giving a relaxed, lazy feel at low speeds.

The rest of the driving experience is more familiar, with the suspension and steering receiving minor tweaks only. A major change will come with the all-new model.

The car still feels incredibly composed on even the most uneven of surfaces. On back roads in Tasmania – including some challenging Targa Tasmania stages – the Porsche held its line despite mid corner bumps and loose gravel.

The ride was firm but not uncomfortable, although we’ll reserve final judgement until we’ve tested the car on Sydney’s potholed back streets.

Inside, the new car is much like the one that preceded it – understated but comfortable and well-finished.

Perhaps Porsche believes the badge on the steering wheel is enough to tell buyers they’re in for something pretty special.

And with the new 911, it’s no empty promise.



Offline AshSimmonds

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  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
http://www.goauto.com.au/mellor/mellor.nsf/story2/316A6FC98940A833CA2574BA00007B30

Quote
First Oz drive: Dual-punch Porsche 911 a knockout

Perfected: PDK transforms non-manual versions of the 911.

A dual-clutch auto and direct-injection boxers improve the 911 breed - at a price

By BYRON MATHIODAKIS 4 September 2008


WITH new direct-injection engine technology, significant suspension modifications and the introduction of a dual-clutch manual gearbox dubbed PDK, Porsche’s facelifted 997 is the most advanced 911 ever.

Available from September 20, it will also be the most expensive, with prices rising about $10,000. Excluding the extra equipment levels that most of the range now boasts, Porsche says the new 911s are only up by around 1.5 per cent.

Visually, the 997’s transition to Series II is subtle, with redesigned front and rear bumpers, revised headlights incorporating bi-Xenon headlights with washers and daytime LED running lights, and reshaped tail-lights being the most obvious.

Look more carefully and you may notice the newly designed wheel, exhaust outlets, door mirrors (which are now larger and double armed) and front air intakes, with the latter’s shape now more in harmony with the lighting/indicator panel above.

The all-wheel drive Carrera 4 (C4) models should be easier to spot now, thanks to the return of the 996 C4’s full-length rear reflector sited between the tail-lights, as well as silver-coloured front air-dam strakes. A big ‘Carrera4’ badge gives the game away too.

But it is under the skin where changes run deepest, resulting in one of the most changed 911s in the model’s 45-year run.

Leading the charge is a pair of new direct fuel injection engines espousing improved efficiencies for Porsche’s trademark water-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder boxer units. They are built at a new facility in Zuffenhausen, alongside the direct-injection V-engines introduced in the Cayenne SUV last year.

Again available in 3.6 and 3.8-litre guises, both feature an aluminium engine block (contributing to a 5kg lighter engine than before), four overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, variable valve timing (called VarioCam Plus in Porsche-speak), and dry-sump lubrication with an on-demand oil pump.

Goals for Porsche’s engineers was to create a new engine family (only the second-generation water-cooled flat-six units since mainstream 911 models abandoned air-cooled engines in 1997) that is significantly more compact, has a much lower centre of gravity, and can be flexible enough to increase or decrease in capacity from under around 2.5-litres to beyond 4.0. The old unit reached its maximum capacity at 3.8.

There are 40 per cent fewer moving parts thanks to innovations like a new timing chain technology and one-piece cylinder-heads with integrated camshaft bearings and guide cylinders for the hydraulic cup-tappets.

The engine’s power-unit rigidity is now 22 per cent better than before, to be able to handle the extra power of a turbo-charger in future iterations such as the one that is expected to feature in the upcoming 997 911 Turbo Series II in 2009.

Porsche has also introduced four special ‘scavenging’ oil pumps to stop oil from ‘slopping’ around inside the engine unevenly at more extreme cornering speeds and angles, improving oil circulation and effectiveness, and reducing mechanical friction, to the point where there is a two per cent fuel economy benefit.

The latest 911 engines also introduce a new air-intake manifold to aid power and torque accessibility, while new air filters last 30 per cent longer than before. A more efficient exhaust system also helps achieve a Euro 5 emissions rating.

The upshot of all these, as we reported at the 997 Series II global launch back in June, is a pair of powerplants that deliver the naturally aspirated specific engine output benchmark of 100hp and 110Nm per litre for the first time in a 911.

The all-new 3614cc flat six serves up 254kW at 6500rpm (up 15kW on the old 3596cc engine), while the Carrera S’ 3800cc secures 283kW at 6000rpm instead of the 261kW rating of the old 3824cc unit.

Peak torque, meanwhile, rises by 20Nm in either case – to 390Nm at 4400rpm and 420Nm at 4400rpm for the 3.6 and 3.8-litre respectively.

PDK stands for Doppelkupplungsgetriebe – a seven-speed double-clutch transmission with roots dating back a quarter of a century to when Porsche first developed the system (successfully) for motor racing – although the current item has ‘only’ been in development over the last nine years, according to Porsche’s powertrain program manager – 911, Thomas Krickelberg.

Today’s version is co-devised with specialists ZF, and – like the (completely unrelated) DSG item pioneered in a production vehicle by Audi in the 2003 TT V6 – differs from a conventional transmission by being a fully manual gearbox that comprises two clutches that activate two separate sets of pre-selected gear ratios.

Yes, the regular six-speed manual gearbox 911 (an Aisin-built unit now boasting a higher third-gear ratio in the interests of better official fuel consumption results) has a marginally faster top speed, but 911s packing PDK offer quicker acceleration – even when they’re not fitted with the optional Sports Chrono Plus pack’s launch control system.

Nevertheless, the Carrera S Coupe manual breaks free of the 300km/h barrier at 302km/h (up 9km/h), which is within a whisker of the 996 911 GT3 and 996 Turbo, while the Carrera S Coupe with PDK’s 300km/h top speed is 15km/h more than the old S Tiptronic.

Similarly, the regular 911 Carrera coupe manual will achieve 289km/h (up 4km/h), which is just 2km/h quicker than its PDK sibling and 7km/h faster than the outgoing 911 3.6 Tiptronic auto.

Of the rear-wheel drive 911s, only the Cabriolet 3.6 manual fails to breach the five-second 0-100km/h-acceleration time at 5.1 seconds (PDK: 4.9 seconds), with both the 3.6 and 3.8 manual coupes shaving one-tenth of a second over the Series 1 cars at 4.9 seconds and 4.7 seconds respectively.

Pick PDK and you cut another 0.2 seconds off these times for a 0.8-second saving compared to the old Tiptronic times, while another 0.2 seconds is sliced again if the Sport Chrono Plus’ launch control system is fitted, for a 0-100km/h result that is just 0.4 seconds shy of the 997 Turbo manual’s 3.9-second sprint time and 0.6 seconds for the Turbo Tiptronic.

Similarly, economy and emissions benefit too, with the 3.6 manual coupe using six per cent less fuel at 10.3 litres per 100km (previously 11L/100km), while the S equivalent is eight per cent more economical at 11.5 versus 10.6L/100km.

In the PDK guise the gains are even greater, with both the Carrera coupes 13 per cent more frugal - 11.2 down to 9.8L/100km for the 3.6 and 11.7 down to 10.2L/100km for the 3.8.

As a result, CO2 emissions fall by a similar margin, with the Carrera coupe manual nine per cent cleaner (266 versus 242g/km) and the Carrera S coupe manual 10 per cent better (277 versus 250g/km).

PDK versions of both 911 coupes emit 15 per cent less CO2 emissions – from 270 down to 230g/km for the 3.6 and 283 down to 240g/km for the 3.8.

Furthermore, all 3.6-litre manual models now score the 3.8-litre Carrera’s clutch, which features self-adjusting pressure technology.

Porsche has also modified the suspension and brakes for the 911 Series II, with revised springs, dampers and anti-roll bars across the range.

Of course, being Porsche, the technical changes are widespread, but perhaps the most obvious change for 911 aficionados is the inclusion of an additional stop spring on both the front and rear axles, which (controversially) eliminates the car’s famous nose ‘bobbing’ action.

Whether it’s a manual or PDK 911, buyers can now choose a mechanical limited-slip differential (LSD) with a 22 per cent locking action under power and 27 per cent locking action in overrun, to improve traction and stability through trickier corners or over rough surfaces.

Another option, this time on the base 3.6 but standard on all S cars, is a refined version of Porsche’s Active Suspension Management (PASM), which is said to enhance smoothness, dynamic performance and response thanks to the inclusion of new adaptive dampers.

It is available in PASM Normal (alternating from standard comfort to a firmer set-up according to how hard the car is being driven) or PASM Sport (hardest-setting dampers, with the entire car dropped by 10mm). There’s also a ‘special variant’ PASM Sport package available with unique active sports suspension, a 20mm ride-height drop and a mechanical LSD.

Meanwhile, C4 911s adopts the current 911 Turbo’s newer electronically controlled AWD system, which in turn was inherited from the Porsche’s Cayenne SUV.

Fitted as standard with a mechanical rear axle differential, this new electronic Porsche Traction Management (PTM) system replaces the viscous multi-plate clutch AWD system in the outgoing C4, for “...an even higher standard of driving stability, traction and agile handling”, according to Porsche.

According to Mr Krickelberg, PTM continuously shifts torque from up to 100 per cent rearwards to 100 per cent front-wards in extreme conditions, although in everyday driving its rear-to-front ratio is around 95:5. This compares to the outgoing C4’s fixed 60:40 split.

Otherwise, engine outputs are the same as the new C2, while the C4 offers up to 8.5 per cent more power and up to 12.9 per cent greater fuel economy than before, while lowering CO2 emissions by up to 15.4 per cent.

As before, the C4 is 44mm wider in the rear compared to the Carrera 2.

Regardless of whether it’s a C2 or C4, all 911s now have a new hill-hold device called Start-off Assistant, to keep the cars from rolling backwards at launch speeds.

Larger (now 330mm) disc brakes mean greater stopping ability than previously, with new callipers on the 3.6-litre models, while PSM-fitted cars now score Porsche’s new Brake Pre-Filling and Brake Assistant functions previously available only on the Carrera 4 and the Turbo for quicker and more powerful responses.

There’s also a new tyre pressure monitor.

Moving to the Cabriolet models, Porsche now uses a harder wearing material for the soft top, which still takes 20 seconds to open and shut and can be erected on the move at up to 50km/h.

The additional standard specifications offset the slight reduction in engine weight, with kerb weights increasing between 5kg and 20kg.

The Carrera coupe manual rises 20kg to 1415kg, while the PDK version is 10kg heavier than the Tiptronic S version it replaces at 1435kg. The Carrera S coupe manual is 5kg heavier (1425kg), while the PDK version is up the same amount, to 1460kg. The Cabriolet and Cabriolet S weigh in at 1500 and 1510kg respectively.

Going all-wheel drive adds around 55kg to the weight of each model.

Other range-wide upgrades include a third-generation PCM3 version of the Porsche Communications Management (PCM) system, comprising a bigger new 6.5-inch touch-screen. It can be optioned with satellite-navigation including a 40GB hard drive, plus voice control and a TV tuner.

Further changes run to larger and more ergonomically user-friendly buttons in the console, and the option of ventilated front seats.

Porsche expects 911s packing PDK to account for about two-thirds of all sales, up from the Tiptronic’s 50 per cent share, with the Carrera S taking slightly more market share than the 3.6 models.

The original 997 series 911 arrived in Australia in October 2004.

It is just the third-generation car to wear the famous set of numbers since the 911 debuted as the 901 (until Peugeot complained about the use of a ‘0’ in the middle) in 1963 – although Porsche fans will rightly point out that continual development created virtually all-new 911s in 1989 (964 series) and 1993 (993). The second-generation 911 was unveiled as the 996 in 1997.

2009 Porsche 997 911 Series II pricing:
Carrera Coupe    $ 210,300
Carrera Coupe (PDK)    $ 216,900
Carrera S Coupe    $ 237,500
Carrera S Coupe (PDK)    $ 244,100
Carrera Cabriolet    $ 231,200
Carrera Cabriolet (PDK)    $ 237,800
Carrera S Cabriolet    $ 258,400
Carrera S Cabriolet (PDK)    $ 265,000
Carrera 4 Coupe    $ 226,500
Carrera 4 Coupe (PDK)    $ 233,100
Carrera 4S Coupe    $ 253,700
Carrera 4S Coupe (PDK)    $ 260,300
Carrera 4 Cabriolet    $ 247,400
Carrera 4 Cabriolet (PDK)    $ 254,000
Carrera 4S Cabriolet    $ 274,600
Carrera 4S Cabriolet (PDK)    $ 281,200
Targa 4    $ 247,400
Targa 4 (PDK)    $ 254,000
Targa 4S    $ 274,600
Targa 4S (PDK)    $ 281,200



Offline mhh

  • Chief Test Pilot

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Location: Adelaide
That second report is called First Oz drive - except that from reading the article, it is clear he hasn't driven it!

Either that or he couldn't find a single thing to say about what it was like.  :doh:

I wish they hadn't messed up the PDK with the dumb "paddles" that move differently to every other paddle box on the market.  Not a good move for anyone with more than one car (ie, most 911 owners).



Offline Aircon

  • Master Baiter 300kph+ club
  • Who said it couldn't be done?

  • Joined: Mar 2007

  • Drives: TBA
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
  • Name: Peter
That second report is called First Oz drive - except that from reading the article, it is clear he hasn't driven it!

Either that or he couldn't find a single thing to say about what it was like.  :doh:

I wish they hadn't messed up the PDK with the dumb "paddles" that move differently to every other paddle box on the market.  Not a good move for anyone with more than one car (ie, most 911 owners).

i just saw an ad on tv for a new mazda...they have the gear change in the same place :)

I love my car. Buy your own



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