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Offline mondi

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One thing I have wondered about modern cars, will they be in any condition in years to come, unless they are stored away to be preserved.


The older classics and vintage cars are made of steel(mainly) and this can be welded, chromed, restored. What about the plastic things of today. Will they still be in one piece or a melted mess. Just look at a 355's interior(???) 

I guess what I am trying to say is will these modern jobs be restorable or trash. Unless as mentioned they are preserved which means never driven, etc, etc.



Offline dkabab

ive read several times about the 'life span' of a carbon fibre tub, and while many different sources say different, 15-20 years has been quoted several times... which makes the mcf1 and f50 approaching their life span....



Offline RMV

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One thing I have wondered about modern cars, will they be in any condition in years to come, unless they are stored away to be preserved.


The older classics and vintage cars are made of steel(mainly) and this can be welded, chromed, restored. What about the plastic things of today. Will they still be in one piece or a melted mess. Just look at a 355's interior(???) 

I guess what I am trying to say is will these modern jobs be restorable or trash. Unless as mentioned they are preserved which means never driven, etc, etc.

Very good point, Mondi.  Can restoration techniques adapt to the new materials and technologies used?  You'd hope so.  A lot of people say that given the reliance on electrics and computers in modern cars, once these things shit themselves, and spare parts become obsolete, the cars will be unrepairable.  I wonder if this is an accurate assessment, or whether repair techniques/the aftermarket will satisfy any needs that arise.



Offline AshSimmonds

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...I even seriously doubt the potential collectibility of limited edition production cars from Ferrari or Lamborghini (i.e. CS, Scuderia, LP-670SV etc)....

One thing I have wondered about modern cars...

...restorable or trash. Unless as mentioned they are preserved which means never driven, etc, etc.

This is my problem also - the 360 CS and G SE are two cars I just adore and think are worthy of classic/collectible status, but guys like me 20-30 years from now - who are we gunna find to do stuff to them?

I still feel reasonably confident there will be a market for pre 95'ish cars - let's say pre-pop-up-punishment - where you can get bits of metal and plastic and stuff to make your toy keep going. 

But in 20 years will there be a market of people who still deal with computers and electronics from cars when such devices are now (in 2030) biometric and everything is controlled by nanobots?

Face it - on the streets today we're not looking at the museum pieces of the distant future, we're looking at the museum pieces of within our lifetime.  Then again, some of the girls I've dated have said that about me.

It's hard to think of anything created from now on as being something that will endure, we effectively create stuff that will not long be worthless - of course this thinking has been going on since at least Plato though.



Offline RMV

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ive read several times about the 'life span' of a carbon fibre tub, and while many different sources say different, 15-20 years has been quoted several times... which makes the mcf1 and f50 approaching their life span....

So what options exist?  Replacement tubs?  Or will it be a matter of once a tub is 'lifed', if it's not replaced (if that's even an option), the car's use becomes restricted for safety reasons?   



Offline allanuber


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I speak from experience!

Done about 500 track days in one form or another.

Erm. If it was 500 women in one form or another that'd be impressive.
C'mon, do it!



Offline dkabab

So what options exist?  Replacement tubs?  Or will it be a matter of once a tub is 'lifed', if it's not replaced (if that's even an option), the car's use becomes restricted for safety reasons?   

no idea, not my field. just saying what i have read. how long has CF been used commercially? i guess its like lasik surgery, sure its fine now, but who knows what the effects will be in 30+ years....



Offline mondi

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Very good point, Mondi.  Can restoration techniques adapt to the new materials and technologies used?  You'd hope so.  A lot of people say that given the reliance on electrics and computers in modern cars, once these things shit themselves, and spare parts become obsolete, the cars will be unrepairable.  I wonder if this is an accurate assessment, or whether repair techniques/the aftermarket will satisfy any needs that arise.


But in 20 years will there be a market of people who still deal with computers and electronics from cars when such devices are now (in 2030) biometric and everything is controlled by nanobots?



One thing that does amaze me is the fact that there are guys out there that are changing with the materials used and can do some mind blowing things to fix "stuff".  As they say "where there is a will, there is a way". I have learned a lot playing with my modernish exotic.

I can't comment on Lambo or Ferrari electrics but some of the computers and control boxes I have worked on in the automotive world have been unrepairable due to the fact that they are full of resin so you can't get into them. So once they are dead that's it.



 



Offline allanuber


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Very good point, Mondi.  Can restoration techniques adapt to the new materials and technologies used?  You'd hope so.  A lot of people say that given the reliance on electrics and computers in modern cars, once these things shit themselves, and spare parts become obsolete, the cars will be unrepairable.  I wonder if this is an accurate assessment, or whether repair techniques/the aftermarket will satisfy any needs that arise.

Meh. There's already people producing 'better than original' carbon fibre bits to replace Ferrari 355 (and 360 parts). Finding computers to control car features is getting easier and easier... and in relative terms cheaper. You won't have originality - however you'll be able to keep something valuable running.

I think we got onto this argument when what was proposed as a fun way to thrash cars around a track at twilight became the usual pissing contest about who'd be fastest around the track.

For me, I'd much rather belt the 360 around the track 2 seconds slower then I would have been in the EVO. Far more skill needed, much more tactile and real, and a lot more fun seeing I'd not be anywhere near the front of any pack regardless of the car...
C'mon, do it!



Offline Ferrari Fissatore

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The "what do we do when these things are old" question has been around since the 19th century cars...

There are already extensive aftermarket parts available for just about anything. There's a local electronics specialist that's working on a replacement gearbox TCU, plug and play swap out, you name it, it can be copied/remade.

When the 360 came out in 1999, it's revolutionary "pulse mig" repair welding technilogy was WAY SCARY.

Now it's common place, every other body shop has a pulse mig for aluminium. The Gallardo structure is also well known now, and can be welded...... it's really not that hard.

Cars ARE designed for a shorter life span nowadawys though, thats for sure. GM group and Ford (that I know of and probably many many others) actually employ people to design a car that will last the warranty period reliably enough to maintain sales, then generate a certain amount of income for the second stage of its life, then die off for recycling after 10 years or so.


Carbon tubs like those on race cars and F50 etc are repairable and renewable to an extent. But it's always visible.



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