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Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
Sometimes I just wish I was an internet hermit and never read anything beyond a few select sites.

There was an article online about some guy who got done for speeding 4 times between Sydney and Adelaide, most of them 30-50kph over the limit.  Ok, good for a laugh, but have a look at the drama and rage it incited from Joe Average out there...

---> http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/comments/0,22058,23011647-5001021,00.html

Makes me happy to associate with the people I do and forget the rest of the world is out there.



Offline Marco


  • Joined: Jan 2008

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Speed kills, though, remember?  Slow down and all is well.  I'm sure this guy died at least three times on this trip.



Offline leburpor

  • Loves Tom Cruise

  • Joined: Feb 2007

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168kmh and some of the people who have commented react with shock and horror...geez.... :faint: :waah:



Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
How can someone in the Aussie press get away with an "article" like this... :confused:

---> http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,22997226-5007146,00.html

Quote
Standby for RTA sanctimony over road toll

By Paul Pottinger

STAND by for some preening and self-serving sanctimony from the Roads and Traffic Authority, that competence-challenged government agency allegedly responsible for road infrastructure and licensing.
Its drones are making much of the fact some 50 fewer people were killed on NSW roads in 2007 than in any year since 1945.

Indeed, "only" 443 people were killed in the 413 crashes recorded in the state.

Well, break out the bunting. If we're to be guided by previous form, the RTA will shamelessly claim credit for this.

It will choose to ignore certain salient facts, such as the quantum advances in vehicle safety technology that mean drivers of new cars are not only more likely to survive an impact, but also they're more likely to avoid one.

Worse, the RTA will draw a veil over the complicity of its own quite mad regulations in endangering NSW drivers, particularly the inexperienced ones.

Simply put, the RTA refuses to countenance teaching young people to drive competently.

Never mind the contradiction wherein would-be motor cyclists are obliged to pass a regulated training program; the RTA's general manager of road safety, Doctor Soames Job, actually maintains that teaching drivers to drive properly makes them more likely to crash.

Let's extend the good doctor's logic to, say, airline pilots. Forget the expense and effort of actual flying lessons. Just have them slap on a P-plate, taxi about the runway for 50 hours, show them a picture of a crash while exhorting: "Mind you youngsters don't go and do that, eh? Now here's your wings and chocks away!"

This might matter less if the RTA didn't ban P-platers from many of the safest vehicles available to humanity. The RTA's prohibited eight-cylinder, turbo and super-charged high performance vehicles list is a hit - or mostly miss - list of cars banned to learners.

Anyone with the least automotive knowledge - which pretty much precludes anyone at the RTA - knows that turbo or supercharging by no means makes a vehicle a performance monster.

Indeed, some of the banned cars have less than half the power of those to which the RTA gives green light.

If fatalities were fewer in 2007, it was despite rather than because of the Road Tolls Authority.



Offline Aircon

  • Master Baiter 300kph+ club
  • Who said it couldn't be done?

  • Joined: Mar 2007

  • Drives: Pork
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
  • Name: Peter
there should be more articles like that.
I love my car. Buy your own



Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
there should be more articles like that.

One of the guys on Aussie Elises works in his building or something and pointed to his blog:

---> http://blogs.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/carsguide

Refreshing stuff!



Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23024712-26017,00.html

Quote
Properly analysed, road death toll figures demonstrate there is an extraordinary lack of debate about the real reasons behind fatalities and injuries in crashes. An examination of the figures shows that with all the speed and red light cameras, anti-alcohol measures, vehicle safety, improvements, road upgrades, street lighting and big spending on creative advertising over the past five years, the death toll has largely plateaued. Over that period total national vehicle registrations (adjusted for deregistered vehicles) have risen from 13.162 million (10.365 million of them passenger vehicles) to just over 14.8 million (11.51 million passenger vehicles). During 2007, an average of 9200 new (and safer) vehicles came on to the roads every month.

Figures from the federal Australian Transport Safety Bureau show that for several years state authorities have set the Christmas-New Year holiday period at 13 days (in Victoria in 2007 it began at midnight on December 20 and ended at midnight on January4). In 2006, the last full year for which ATSB figures are available, 62 people died: drivers, passengers, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians. That represented an average of 4.7deaths a day. The same figures show that for the entire year, deaths averaged 4.38 a day and the most lethal weekly period year-long is Friday to Sunday, when there is an average of 5.4 deaths a day. For the five days of Easter 2007, there were an average of five deaths a day.

It shows during holiday periods roads are no more dangerous than on the average weekday, and certainly safer than during normal weekends. And this is despite the diluting holiday logistics of extra distances covered, heavier traffic, bigger passenger loads, unroadworthy vehicles, drivers not used to distance driving, greater stress, more distractions and increased alcohol consumption.

Quote
All ordinary fatal crashes (can there be such a thing?) are attended by local police, not an elite crash investigation unit. So the death of a lone driver on a straight country road against a tree, in the absence of any obvious evidence of alcohol, drugs, another vehicle or braking marks, leads police to tick the box marked speed. Never mind that it could be caused by 30,000km-old windscreen wiper blades crazing the windscreen, bald tyres, scored brake discs, no seatbelts or even a huntsman spider falling into the driver’s lap from a sun visor.

Excessive speed is a simple reason commonly cited to explain a very complex problem. There is no single reason for a crash. Every crash is the result of a series of tumblers falling in the wrong sequence. Multiple-death crashes are extremely rare occurrences. However, no official will admit that factors such as vehicle roadworthiness, road engineering or maintenance, weather, or even untimely text messaging could be significant factors.

Quote
It reinforces the common feeling that if an act is made illegal, it will fix things. However, people will always ignore what they perceive as bad or unenforceable laws: tailgating, failure to keep left, the use of mobile phones and (in some states) the suspension of dangly objects from the rear vision mirror.

Quote
In May 2005, the South Australian Government announced it would spend $35.6 million of its road safety budget of $60 million on 50 new red light intersection cameras, adding to the 12 existing cameras that in their first year of operation in 2004 generated $11 million in revenue. Yet the Government’s official figures showed that over the previous eight years, disobeying traffic lights had caused only 1.34per cent of fatal crashes.

Quote
And, based on the statistics, that “something serious” could well be understanding that the huge emphasis on speeding and drink driving may even be counterproductive. Anecdotal evidence suggests that 95 per cent of people don’t exceed speed limits and even fewer drink and drive. So their belief is that if they avoid those offences, they don’t have to pay much more attention to being safe or driving carefully.



Offline AshSimmonds

  • Geekitecht

  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Drives: GF's shitbox :(
  • Location: Adelayed
  • Name: Humble Narrator
  • www: AshSimmonds.com
http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,23046318-5001021,00.html

Quote
ANY car on the road could now be a cop car, thanks to a NSW Police initiative to combat hoons and law breakers.

Highway patrol officers have used unmarked police cars for years.

But the latest scheme sees a range of high performance sports vehicles including Ford Falcon Typhoons and Suburu Impreza WRXs patrolling the streets.

The vehicles are fitted with the latest accessories and are in a range of colours - some even sporting “P” plates - to fit in with vehicles commonly associated with car hoons.

Police Traffic Services Commander Chief Superintendent John Hartley said the scheme was part of a ploy to “blend in” with the hoons.

Quote
"We're using covert style vehicles which are, in the main, high performance cars like the (Ford) Typhoons.

"They are a new strategy to get cars that blend in with the hoodlums.

Quote
"We've found that people usually slow down and modify their driving behaviour when they see a marked police car.

No fucking shit, they must have a team of 5th graders working on that one.



Offline waz356


  • Joined: Feb 2006

  • Location:
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http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,23046318-5001021,00.html

No fucking shit, they must have a team of 5th graders working on that one.


I have always said that a greater "marked" police presence on the road is the single most efficient way to slow down traffic. But where's the revenue in that - or am I just being cynical?  :doh:



Offline j15


  • Joined: Oct 2006

  • Location: Sydney
http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,23046318-5001021,00.html

No fucking shit, they must have a team of 5th graders working on that one.


It's amazing that they recognised the fact marked police cars on the road make people more aware and attentive, then decide the best way to make things safer is to hide their presence with all these unmarked cars. Blatant money grab.



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